Become a Ministerial Officer with a £26K+ starting salary with youth-friendly DHSC

Fantastic apprenticeship opportunity: Apply now to be a Ministerial Correspondence and Public Enquiries Officer with the youth-friendly Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) in London – applications close 11th November 2019.

Salary: £26,472 per year

The youth-friendly Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) is recruiting EO staff, including apprentices, to work within Ministerial Correspondence and Public Enquiries (MCPE) at the Department of Health and Social Care.

This is an opportunity to work in an exciting and challenging environment. The MCPE team is a great place to get a good grounding in handling governement overday operations, and you’ll get an overview of the Department and the workings of Government. Apply now or read on to find out more.

What will you be doing?

Working with friendly and dedicated colleagues, you will provide a high-quality service both to Ministers and the public. You can feel proud that you will be dealing with some of the highest volumes of enquiries across Whitehall – because health matters to everyone. Health is one of the top issues and health policies hit the headlines on a daily basis, so the DHSC’s work is often in the public eye.

Some examples of what you might actually do every day (with support and training) include:

  • Drafting correspondence for Ministers
  • Responding to the public via phone, email and letter
  • Assessing and responding to requests received under the Freedom of Information Act
  • Assessing and responding to Right of Access requests

What skills do you need to apply?

  • You’ll be keen to act professionally and always do your best.
  • You’ll have excellent written English skills including grammar, punctuation, spelling and the ability to draft documents to a good standard under pressure.
  • You’ll have solid basic digital skills including Microsoft Word and Outlook.
  • You will be ready to work on your communication skills to build and maintain good relationships with internal and external stakeholders, including those who are senior to you.
  • You’ll understand the importance of handling public enquiries as efficiently and as well as possible.
  • You’ll have good self-management skills. This means that with training you’ll learn how to organise a wide variety of tasks according to what needs to be done first, and you’ll care about getting the details right.

What could this role lead to?

The DHSC needs the young people it hires to really care about what they do, so they will expect you to remain in this role for at least 18 months. It could be some of the most rewarding work you’ve ever done. It could lead to great things in the future too, because the DHSC are dedicated to helping your career development. You will have access to an exciting range of opportunities across the Ministers, Accountability and Strategy directorate that will help you in your career progression.

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